Permaculture and Drought

Massachusetts is in a severe drought this August.  When the three new students looked at the garden today it was with a great lack of luster.  What they saw and what I saw were divergent sights.  The excitement I had to demonstrate to them the bounty in the garden was a pleasant surprise for me.  They got it and what could have been a real dud of a class turned into the four of us talking, discussing and working hard to tidy a jewel in the raw of a garden.

It all started when one guy grabbed a bunch of clover he was weeding and said, “The leaves are shaped like a heart so I can eat it!”  I quickly looked to make sure he wasn’t ingesting something like foxglove and saw that it was common pesky yellow blooming clover, and yes, edible indeed.

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Before I knew it we had not only pruned the raspberries,

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tidied the herb gardens,

weeded galore, edged large portions of the gardens as well as harvested a big yellow bucket of mature oregano blooms.

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I couldn’t decide whether the chartreuse color was more wonderful or the scent of the oregano of a season spent in the sun.

Within each task we completed there was a lesson and this group of students responded with chatter, tasting, smelling and questions and comments.  A fourth inmate actually came out to just watch which is always nice too.

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We decided to take photos today of all the perennial things in the garden, that are drought tolerant, turkey tolerant and thrive side by side with the weeds.  Despite how awful the strawberries look I was able to demonstrate their prowess in the June garden.

The self seeding nature of dill and cilantro offered another lesson on annuals that keep coming back once they are planted if you let them mature.  We haven’t planted dill or cilantro in years but it comes back with gusto each spring.

The mint and the nepeta were swarming with white butterflies enjoying late summer nectar and they became a crucial lesson when one man asked if something was wrong that there were so many white butterflies.  Ah! The joys of an open air classroom!

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The August rhubarb also offered its lesson of perennial food.  Not much to look at today but you should have seen it in May.

So with the lot we are given we find hope and success in the permaculture that is just there in front of our noses if only we have the time to see it, the open minds of inmates to appreciate it and the gratitude to embrace it.  Today was a refreshing class despite the drought and the heat.  Nature’s demonstration of it’s reserves for the future is remarkable.

 

 

Weeds of Change

The biggest lesson in the garden this season is the abundance of things in bloom albeit things not intended.  So much effort goes into so many things and sometimes the things right in front of us are the things we really want but cannot see.  We are in a drought and things planted have died but the things that thrived are so beautiful.

IMG_4932This my friend is a bucket of weeds.  Seemingly, pesky in the wrong place at the wrong time additions to the garden.  Funny thing is, they are drought tolerant, native and edible plants as well as really pretty. Above are chicory, mint and Queen Anne’s lace.

IMG_4939Above we added daylilys and tansy, both edible as well.  This big bucket with at least 150 stems went into the visiting room to cheer visitors to the Pre Release Center.  It looked like it could have been installed in the State House lobby!

So as I look around at the students and the garden I see great things right in front of me despite the drought.

IMG_4927Drifts of flowering oregano add fragrance to the hot breeze.

IMG_4933Bouquets and bouquets of flowers despite the parched grass.

Let the weeds that self seed be the weeds of change and let us indulge in their answers.

Thank you for following this blog as I teach this program of organic sustainability to men who need job skills, life skills and beauty in their lives.

 

 

 

 

June Blooms

IMG_4601I always find it crazy the way garlic and strawberries do their show at the same time. Usually plants seem to know when to shine together, like tomatoes and basil or rhubarb and mint.  But, alas, today we harvested strawberries and garlic.  Another reminder to live and learn next to things that have little in common but the world around them.

The students picked 5 or 6 institutional peanut butter containers of strawberries last week and the same this week.  The first year we gave up complete hope on a strawberry harvest due to the turkeys and then WOW we get a gorgeous harvest.

We have developed quite the permaculture garden at the Pre Release Center Garden, all thanks to many challenges we have faced, little water, turkeys, only one morning a week to tend the garden as well as a desire to work with what we have.  It has been a real lesson in going with what works.  The things we are tending come back each year without our seeding, planting or watering.  They are raised organically so they are very healthy and they are used by the site which is about as local, healthy and sustainable as you want to eat!

For weeks the men have harvested cilantro, sage, rhubarb, thyme, strawberries, chives, mint and each week I encourage them to eat the Johnny Jump Ups and the chive blossoms

IMG_4418…  soon we will have dill self seeded from last year and about knee high now.  The next crop on the horizon is the raspberry patch with many hard little rock like berries ripening in the June breeze.

Today we picked enough mint, cilantro, sage, chives and garlic to give to the kitchen for a pasta dish being made for the entire center.  I call that success.  I call learning how to grow perennial fruits, herbs and flowers a real hard core life skill.

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Every week we harvest buckets of flowers to put into the visiting room for family and friends.  It is such a proud feeling for the students to put the flowers on the tables and know they will bring joy to visitors.

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Fruition

Last Autumn we planted 100s of bulbs and this week we harvested them.

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The students made 25 bouquets for visitors.  A couple of buckets went to the Emerald Necklace Conservancy Office to give away to visitors there as well.

If you are ever at 125 The Fenway on a Wednesday and stroll by around lunchtime to visit,  you might just see some flowers there to enjoy yourself.

Teaching with beautiful results.

 

 

 

 

Spring Lessons

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While I teach the students organic gardening practices every Wednesday, the rest of the week they work in the Emerald Necklace Parks.  This week they have been shoveling heavy spring snow.  I want to share with you part of the Mission Statement for our Maintenance Collaborative:

“Increase maintenance of the Emerald Necklace park in a cost-effective manner. The Maintenance Collaborative crews provide over 5000 hours of maintenance work in the park each year. A well-maintained park improves the short and long-term health of plantings and park eco-systems, increases use of the park by residents and visitors, and increases park safety. Given the continual pressure on state and local budgets, the Maintenance Collaborative increases the level of park maintenance in an extremely cost-efficient manner.”

Yesterday we did a team building exercise in “continuity” as a way of illustrating to the students the idea of supporting each other’s work, be it in the classroom, in the parks or in their larger lives. Maintaining a massive park entails a great deal of team work as does building a supportive life and community.

We each had a pile of flowers; forsythia, daffodils and hyacinths. For ten minutes we drew and then passed the paper to the next student for 10 minutes and so on until 60 minutes later we had 6 cohesive drawings, all different but all in the same theme.

 

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While some botanical images were more sophisticated than others, more primitive, robust or gentle … they all came together as a series of equally beautiful images because we shared our talents and our strengths.  “One for all and all for one” as someone pointed out.

 

Go With What Works

One of the biggest lessons we learn in the garden is to go with what works. Between turkeys eating seeds, lack of water, shade and limited number of hours we have in the garden (Wednesday) it is increasingly prudent to plant things that thrive by themselves.

Today we divided the very overgrown woodie Montauk Daisies. I brought in a small bucket of these a number of years ago and we now have many gigantic mature plants ready for division. These require no water, just compost, room to reach their full habit and sun.
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From three plants we divided them into 25 plants. Since our goal this year is to produce flowers to give away we are well on our way to producing a beautiful crop of fall, fragrant sustainable cut flowers. This is what organic gardening boils down to, taking advantage of what does work in nature and not working against nature.  A few things popping up today in the garden:

Johnny jump ups: edible perennial, charming, harmless
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Cilantro: self seeded, edible annual, fragrant, delicious, harmlessIMG_3135

Please stay tuned as we continue to explore what works.  Nature is a great life lesson too when it comes to behavior, success, self respect and cooperation, all life skills springing from the earth.

Experience

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I was standing in line today at Panera waiting to buy a loaf of bread and heard someone shout my name, I looked up and it was one of my former students.  He waved vigorously and flashed a generous smile but then dipped back into the kitchen to work.

I can only say that I think Fredrick would be happy.  Like a lot of my students, Olmsted did not have the easiest start in life. His mother died of a laudanum overdose when he was just four.  He struggled getting started and despite having come from a family of means he still struggled with his demons, depression and manic phases albeit coupled with a life of tremendous creative accomplishment.  Olmsted was an experiential learner. Many of my students struggle with reading and writing, be it from learning disabilities, language barriers, no support or a whole host of other reasons.  I teach assuming others learn experientially.

His father’s generosity and patience as well as Olmsted’s inability to settle into a career took him to many far away places; China as a young man aboard a ship, the southern states writing about slavery and the Civil War for what would become the NYTimes and Europe to study the picturesque and the pastural styles in landscape design.  A combination of privilege and his identification with all kinds of people provided him wonderful experience, knowledge and a desire for designing democratic urban parks in the United States.

The men on the Emerald Necklace Maintenance Collaborative have the opportunity to acquire job skills as well as work experience, fresh air and a certificate of completion in a program using the Master Gardener curriculum.   Whether the student goes into this field or not at least they have had the opportunity to have maintained a grande example of American History and a living work of art here in Boston.  I hope all their experiences good and bad, like Olmsted, will provide them with the tools to build something wonderful as well.